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20121122
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the "huffington post." thanks for joining us. >> thank you formation me un. >> eliot: polling is more than picking up the phone, calling 12 random people and adding up who said what? >> increasingly, when i started in this business 25 years ago you could do something like that. you could get a scientifically random sample, a few reasonable steps to make it rigorous and not have to do a whole lot of waiting or adjustment afterwards. now there have been a combination of things. lower response rates the whole cell phone problem basically two-thirds of us have two kinds of phones. another third roughly have a cell phone only, and it's a whole lot harder to know what the odds are getting someone over one phone or another. pollsters are having to make a lot of assumptions one way or another about either about the demographics of who they interview or the mechanism that they use to select it. >> eliot: i want to break this down a little bit. the moment you talk about waiting some answers more than others you're putting into play an opportunity for the pollster to exercise discretion that may be correct o
these wonderful advance there is was no backlash. the republicans didn't use this as a wedge issue. they didn't run ads on it. they didn't bring it up at the debate. there was silence. it means that we as gay americans, we're wedge no more. >> eliot: expanding rights for gays and lesbians, and now it's the ballot box where the public by majority vote say we're believe in this conception of civil rights. it's a fundamental and very historic wonderful thing to see. there is this gaping hole in federal law. explain why it is still there and what we wanted to do about it. >> congress for many years have been dragging its feet on a very simple bill to bandies crime ban ban discriminating for being gay. we expect real progress now that president obama has been reelected in terms of an executive order that will ban the companies that profit from federal contracts. that's almost one in four jobs in america. this will be a huge step forward and we're expecting it pretty soon. >> eliot: now just so people can understand many states have passed laws that extend the rights that we're talking about. but
, decline in manufacturing eased a little bit more than expected in november. joining us, chief european economist. ricar ricardo, thanks for joining us. so still a negative territory. what does this point to in terms of the economic decline for the fourth quarter? >> i think it's in line with the idea that real sgchlt dp will decline by at least 0.2%, possibly 0.3%. it will give us a negative entry point in 2013 when i expect an average growth of minus 0.2%. so still moderately recession territory. >> the german flash composite pmi 47.9, services 48, manufacturing 46.8, is germany -- we just saw the 0.2% print. is girl aermany going to have a negative contract? >> i'm looking for a contraction of minus 0.2. so only aed modest one. i expect activity will stabilize in q1 of next year, but obviously that requires a favorable external environment, meaning u.s. not going into this deep due to the fiscal cliff. and also signs of improvement in asia. >> meanwhile the french pmi says the survey there suggests a 0.7% gdp drop in quarter 4 for france. >> that seems quite large. we've seen in rece
protect u.s. personnel. >> the president has been skipping his daily intelligence briefings. >> with respect to iran i want to see a diplomatic resolution to the problem. >> the president's iran policy lacks credibility. the question is whether or not is whether the defense budget is big enough to deal with the major crisis and potential challenges around the world. >> as far as the middle east is concerned, his national policy has been abysmal failure. >> the arrogance and dishonesty is breathtaking. >> there is a circle the wagon operation around barack obama that nobody is going to penetrate. >> very close con tackle with countries like turkey and jordan that immediately border syria and obviously israel which is having already grave concerns as we do about movements of chemical weapons that might occur in such a chaotic atmosphere. >> are we better off in the middle east now than we were four years ago? absolutely not. why? because the policies of the administration and the way its been handling itself. >> when a president of the united states apologizes to religious fan
us? we been halted by the long, but this time of what to document every step of the way. one of my triplet sons was taken out of football because of concussions years ago. now knowing what i know, the game can be made safer. the game is being made safer. so very quickly what we did is we parachuted into oklahoma. we've been following 18 for the entire season. we started in february at each monthly visit them for a week. we've been filming them. their concussion rate has plummeted to we put together our risk management program, 15 different steps. we have a celeron matters, hit sensors on their helmet at the high school level, so we are tracking heads. we are tracking everything that these boys walk we been able to get them. no helmets, not just a correct fit but how to measure it. most import message i have is that the kids want these ether and their helmet or as an earbud or mouthpiece. they want that responsibility taken away from themselves. so right now they are underreported and this this is really helping. >> let me bring bill maher to this conversation. as we mentioned as an
, and hope your it -- before god our grief, our joy, our thanks giving, and your hope. it is important for us as a nation and community as people to gather here in this place to consider the mysteries of duration, of life, of death, and to give thanks for a life well lived, and for service boldly rendered. that is what we will be doing in this time. i think you for sharing in it. may i call your attention to the order of service before you. glorify, god all you works of god. in the high vault of heaven, glorify god. god of grace and glory, you create and sustain the universe in majesty and duty. we thank you for all in who you have planted the desire to know your creation, and to explore your work and your wisdom. lead us, like them, to understand better the wonder and mystery of creation through christ, your eternal word, through whom all things were made. amen. [applause] of those who came before us and made certain that this country rose the first wave of the industrial revolution, the first waves of invention, the first wave of nuclear power. this generation does not intend to flounder in
is killing people. sos sos the media tell us -- >> poverty has reached new b depths. john: but as usual, the media missed the big picture. >> i was only four years old when i saw my mother load theat washing machine for the very first time in her life. w john: his grandmother was thrilled by a washing machine. >> and she sat down in front of, the machine, and she watched entire washing program. >> two, one, fire. john: the machines coming next are even more mesmerizing thanks to competition -- >> offer a prize, and they will come. john: and build cool new cars c and spaceships.sp >> entrepreneurs can do what only governments could dold d before. john: maybe they'll invent the i new cars on cities built onlt water free the tent calls of neb government -- tentacles from government. ideas have sex. wait, what? yes, this writer explains. >> ideas spread, and when they t meet, they can mate.t jon john and because of that, we live in a wonderful world.n that's a our show constant tonight. ♪ >> and now, john stossel. ♪ and i think to, what a wonderful world ♪ john: what a wonderful world
the course of the day have been telling us without a comprehensive solution that history is deemed to repeat itself. without a solution to end the problems of the israeli palestinian conflict, particularly here in gaza, expect it to be another round of violence somewhere on the horizon. >> ayman, thank you, reporting from gaza. martin fletcher is standing by now in tel aviv. what's the feeling there today 20 hours after the cease-fire? are people feeling good about this? describe that. >> reporter: to be honest, alex, i don't think people are feeling too bad about it. i think they are very, very glad that the ground invasion did not take place for 30,000 army reservists. another 45,000 ready to be caught up, if necessary. they are very happy to avoid the invasion and the loss of life. and there is a sense here that we wouldn't have achieved much because the only way is this solution to israel's point of view is through peace or through a mighty knockout blow against the islamic militant organization in gaza. that is not going to happen neither will the former. so it is a stalemate situation
a generational step. >> reporter: boeing has sold more than 800 around the world. but united is the first u.s. airliner to fly the dreamliner in service that began this month. the airlines are big these because they're cheaper to fly and more efficient. they will sell you on creature comforts like the air itself, there is more oxygen on the plane, it is cleaner and less dry. they have huge storage bins too. you can fit four suitcases in here. the plastic body is stronger than metal, so the air pressure inside can be kept at equivalent of 6,000 feet instead of the 8,000, 9,000 in most jets. that translates to higher humidity in the cabin, more comfort, less jet lag, and dry skin. >> the increase in humidity, the pressurization of the cabin. it's a very different experience than today's airplanes. >> reporter: the windows are a third bigger. there's a light show on board. different colors for takeoff, cruising, dinner time. >> we go into the warm colors like candlelight. >> reporter: pilots say the 787 carries next level of safety. >> situational awareness. the airplane produces in the cockpit
of progress in a networked age" use the tere pure progressive. what iss that? >> guest: is my attempt to come up with a term for this new political philosophy that i seeo emerging all around me. e. the book is really kind of a series of stories about these people are trying to change ther world and trying to advance the cause of progress. ban but they don't completely fithei the existing models that we have between the left and the right or the democrats and right republicans. democrats and repub. they believe in many ways that the way the internet was built, the way the web was built, the way things that wikipedia were built, using these collaborative. the works, where people come together from different points of view and openly collaborating, building ideas, that that mechanism is a tremendous engine for progress and growth. but it doesn't necessarily involve a government and doesn't necessarily involve capitalism or big corporation. so when you believe in a system come you don't necessarily believe in the traditional anchors that the left are traditional anchors at the right. so i felt th
. this is the number one thing thousands of business people said was the biggest barrier to investing in the u.s. we have got to upgrade our infrastructure, but we have got to focus on those that are economically important. we have got to understand the things that are driving up the cost of doing business. we know what those are, but we need a plan for going forward we need to create a framework for rapidly developing and the windfall. we have a path to energy independence. that is a bridge to renewable energy. if we can move to dass, we get tremendous benefits -- if we can move to gas, we can get tremendous and benefits. we have not been able to act on these things. >> let me jump to doug and steve and try to poke holes in this in a second. if we roll back time to just before the financial crisis, doug was out there bitching about already, but it is much worse. we are back to 156% of gdp. you are still in crisis mode. you have a private sector and events that led to a government response and a worsening of debt issues, so my question is why is it never on this list to get the private sector in con
and rocket fire killed more than 160 palestinians and 5 israelis. >>> the u.s. ambassador to the united nations is used to defending her country's foreign policy decisions. now susan rice has broken her silence to defend herself. rice is considered a candidate for secretary of state. but she's faced scrutiny because of comments she made following the deadly attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. rice made a tv appearance immediately after the september 11 attack. she suggested protests in benghazi over a u.s.-made name mocked the prophet mohammed triggered the assault on the consulate. but investigators later determined it was likely a premeditated plot by extremists with links to al qaeda. the attackers killed the u.s. ambassador and three other americans. rice broke her silence wednesday in response to rising criticism from members of the republican party. >> i relied solely and squarely on the information provided to me by the intelligence community. i made clear that the information was preliminary. and that our investigations would give us the definitive answers. >> repub
>> thanks to family. >> and letting us join in. i know you want to get home to your family. "fox files starts right now." >> enjoy the holiday, everyone. >> it has been called part of the axis of evil and a socialist nightmare. three generations from the same family the most repressive place on earth. now this 20 something armed with nukes is the dictator of north korea. our cameras go inside the under ground railroad. >> helping north koreans get out, the secret groups. this is extremely dangerous. >> for the first time this detector speaks. >> we escaped over the river at the narrowest part. >> a baumanana baby from the 19. jennifer he esposito have in common? >> he had the heist case i have ever seen. >> we look at the medical mystery story of celiac disease. it's what happens when food and what's in it becomes your enemy. >> >> this is "fox files." >> december 28th, 2011, sub zero temperatures and a winter storm grip north korea as the world's most secretive and oppressive country laid to rest its supreme leader kim jong-il. the world got a rare glimpse inside this sealed off
around the world. and you saw him during the 2012 u.s. campaign. he was campaign manager for the landslide reelection of california governor in 2006. before that a top political advice sor in the white house of george w. bush. he attended the university of delaware from 1988 to 1993. david plouffe crossed paths in schmidt in the late 1980's. he completed his political seasons degree and finned two years ago. he has completed two presidential bids. he was appointed as a senior advice sor to the president in the white house in 2011. he attended is the marks high school before serving in a wide viret of state and national political campaigns. i'm going to ask the two speakers this evening to speak and i had to decide who is going to go first and i decided to use a standard that anyone this this audience could mean and that is whoever has won the most recent presidential election gets to speak first. i think that's the fair enough thing to do so please welcome david plouffe and steve schmidt to the university of delaware. [applause] >> thank you for joining thus evening. it's
and if they had met previously. woman replied they had pat asked about the stay in the u.s. and inquired what she was doing in the hall way. the woman explained she was returning to indian why in a few days and hoped to glimpse of the president. pat arranged to be given a seat at the dinner so she could hear the speech as well as see the president. nixon then left the hall to continue on to the previous engagement. i used the story to begin the talk because i think it brings to light a couple of key points i wish to bring to light about pat nixon and her public role and the role of foreign diplomat. pat met the woman during her travel as second lead. the traveling she did as first and second lead was the past of the job as a political wife. second, this woman was not the wife a ambassador or statesman, she was just a young woman who had come to the united states come out first to see the second lead and come to the united states to study. pat didn't limit her contact on the travels to important people. she treated everyone she met as if they were the most important person in the world. the people
are fortunate to have john turner with us. he teaches religious studies at george mason university in virginia, and his history that we are discussing today is a very important contribution. i'm impressed. it's hard to impress me. i taught utah history 34 times at the university of utah. the -- his first book, "campus crusade for christ: renewal of evangelical in post war america," it was a prize winning book. he's a graduate of notre dame. they'll be in our minds today with football. he is from new york state, upstate, as they call it. not far from where brigham young workedded or paul mira. well, his insight and balance, we'll talk about later on in the program. the other commentators are craig foster, author of two books, critical analyst of appty-mormon in great britain, 1837-1860, and a different god question, myth mitt, the religious right and the mormon question. he also co-authored with the mormon quest for the presidency, and also with the persistence of polygamy andçó mormon anthology. he worked for the family history library in salt lake city, and there, he did research gene lomin
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)

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